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London - St George's Hospital

See us on a map


Address:

Blackshaw Road
London

Post Code:

SW17 0QT


Patients were first dialysed here in 1989

This unit has 310 haemodialysis and 55 peritoneal dialysis patients

This is a transplant centre - view transplant data.


unit image

Haemodialysis at St Georges


Telephone number:

Holiday dialysis enquiries:

Chief Nurse Haemodialysis

Fax:

020 8725 2068

Email Address:

Unit website:

http://www.stgeorges.nhs.uk/services_renalindex.asp

Trust website:

http://stgeorges.nhs.uk

Consultants:

Physicians Dr D Banerjee, Dr D Jones, Prof I MacPhee, Dr SR Nelson, Prof D Oliveira, Dr J Popoola, Dr S Shrivastava.
Surgeons Mr Ahmed Ali, Mr E Chemla, Mr G Maytham, Mr A Ghazanfar, Miss S Heap, Mr M Morsy
Matron Ms Marlene Johnson

Page administered by:

Stephen Nelson


About the unit

The renal unit at St Georges is part of one of countries largest NHS trusts and is co-located with its Medical School. Whilst is has a short history compared to some units it offers the full panoply of services and several new cutting edge therapies. We work closely with our sister unit at St Helier to provide care for a large section of South West London and extending into Surrey and Sussex. The surgical team for St Georges covers this area and also Brighton for complex access and transplants covering a total population of 3.5M.
Satellite dialysis is provided by the unit in North Wandsworth, Collier's Wood and Kingston.

The unit benefits from a very active patients association www.sgkpa.org.uk

The unit is running a ADPKD information and support day July 1st details below
www.pkdcharity.org.uk


Research and special expertise

The Renal Transplantunit has focussed on delivering quality and providing an innovative service. In the eleven years since it was established the following aresome of its achievements:
The first Annual Public Audit of Renal Transplant in the United Kingdom
A non-heart beating donor programme.
Established the first Post-graduate Deanery and Royal College of Surgeons accredited training post in Transplantation Surgery in London.
Appointment of Eric Chemla, Consultant Surgeon with special interest in Vascular Access Surgery.
Appointment of Jiri Fronek, Consultant Surgeon with specialinterest in laparoscopic donor nephrectomy to lead the Living Donor Programme. First UK unit to offer hand assisted retroperitoneal laparoscopic donor nephrectomy. The median hospital stay for donor is greatly reduced usually being about three days and return to work quicker.
Surgical trainee from the training programme appointed to theposition of Consultant Transplant Surgeon at Guy's Hospital, London -the first London trainee for more than 25 years.
2005 - 80 transplants were done during the year. 22 were living donor transplants, 15 of the donors had laparoscopic donor nephrectomies. 52 were heart beating cadaver kidneys and 6 used kidneys from non-heart beating donor. 2006 - 92 transplants.
2007 - 83 transplants were done during the year. 46 were living donor transplants, 24 were heart beating cadaver kidneys and 13 used kidneys from non-heart beating donors.
2008 - 96 transplants were done during the year. 45 were living donor transplants, 41 were heart beating cadaver kidneys and 10 used kidneys from non-heart beatind donors.
2009 - 83 transplants of which 47 were from living donors.
2010 -100 transplants of which 57 were from living donors and 3 were ABO incompatable tranplants.
2011-89 transplants of which 48 were from living donors, 11 were pre-emptive transplants, 5 were ABO and 1 HLA incompatable transplants
2012 - 120 transplants of which 51 were from living donors, 29 were pre-emptive and 1 each ABO and HLA incompatble transplants
2015- 129 transplants of which 44 were from living donors, 35 were pre-emptive and 9 KSS, 3 ALT and 2 ALT chains
2016-132 transplants of which 56 were from living donors, the deceased donor programme was slightly reduced with 76 kidneys tranplanted

The research interests of the Unit span the range from basic to applied clinical research. On the laboratory side the Unit has a longstanding interest in the immunoregulation of the immune response,particularly as applied to autoimmunity. This work is pursued using a number of experimental models and techniques in the areas of cellular immunology and molecular biology. There is close collaboration with groups in the Medical School (St George's, University of London: www.sgul.ac.uk), and ready access to specialised facilities within the School (such as the Biomics Facility: www.sgul.ac.uk/depts/biomics). We also have longstanding collaborative links with the South West Thames Institute for Renal Research (www.swtirr.org.uk) based on the St Helier Hospital site.

On the clinical side there is a continued interest in the development of new immunosuppressant strategies in the setting of renal transplantation; the Unit tries to ensure that as many of its patients as possible are offered the possibility of participating in trials in this area. A significant recent development in this area has been pioneering work on the pharmacogenetics of immunosuppressant drugs,carried out in collaboration with geneticists in the School and Professor David Holt( www.bioanalytics.co.uk). Other areas of significant activity include the design and study of novel access procedures for patients for whom conventional access surgery is becoming difficult or impossible, and the investigation of cardiac risk factors in relation to renal disease.

The Unit, in collaboration with cardiovascular sciences in the School (www.sgul.ac.uk/depts/cvs/cm.cfm), is investigating the nature and implications of cardio-vascular changes in chronic kidney disease. In this field we are conducting both clinical and in vitro research; the work also includes clinical investigations into the nature and effects of hypertension in chronic kidney disease.

Visiting Professors Sponsored wholly or in part by the Kathleen Valles Trust

for 2006

Professor Luisa Berardinelli
Professor Charles Herzog
Professor Prabir Roy-Choudhury

for 2007

Professor Vivek Jha

for 2008

Professor Antonio Norton de Matos
Professor Arif Asif

for 2010
Dr Teun van Gelder

for 2011
Dr Ravi Thadani

for 2012
Dr Vinay Sakhuja

for 2016
Prof Norbert Lamiere

Recent Renal Medicine and Transplantation
Publications

Peer-reviewed Papers

Primary Research

Fisher DL, Plange-Rhule J, Moreton M, Eastwood JB, Kerry SM, Micah F, Johnston A, Cappuccio FP, MacPhee IAM. CYP3A5 as a candidate gene for hypertension: no support from an unselected indigenous West African population. Journal of Human Hypertension 2016; 30: 778-782.

Gale-Grant O, Chemla ES. Single-center results of a series of prosthetic axillary-axillary arteriovenous access grafts for hemodialysis. J Vasc Surg. 2016;64:1741-1746.

Kadhum M, Abbas M, Ghazanfar A. Cardiovascular Risk Assessment in Elderly Living Kidney Donors: Risk Comparison Before and After Donation Using QRISK Equation. Exp Clin Transplant. 2016 Apr 4. doi: 10.6002/ect.2015.0373. [Epub ahead of print]

Kumar S, Jeon JH, Hakim A, Shrivastava S, Banerjee D, Patel U. Long-term Graft
and Patient Survival after Balloon Dilation of Ureteric Stenosis after Renal
Transplant: A 23-year Retrospective Matched Cohort Study. Radiology. 2016;281:301-10.

Case studies

Ghazanfar A, Khan Y, Popoola J. Appendicular Sinus as a Cause of Chronic Psoas Abscess in a Renal Transplant Recipient: A Case Report. Exp Clin Transplant. 2016; 14: 447-449.

Invited reviews

Ali A, MacPhee IAM, Kaski JC, Banerjee D. Cardiac and vascular changes with kidney transplantation. Indian Journal of Nephrology 2016;26:1-9.

Banerjee D. Sudden cardiac death in haemodialysis: clinical epidemiology and mechanisms. J Electrocardiol. 2016;49:843-847.

Di Lullo L, Rivera R, Barbera V, Bellasi A, Cozzolino M, Russo D, De Pascalis A, Banerjee D, Floccari F, Ronco C. Sudden cardiac death and chronic kidney disease: From pathophysiology to treatment strategies. Int J Cardiol. 2016;217:16-27.


Other papers

Davids MR, Eastwood JB, Selwood NH, Arogundade FA, Ashuntantang G, Gharbi MB, Jarraya F, MacPhee IAM, McCulloch M, Plange-Rhule J, Swanepoel CR, Adu D, for the African Association of Nephrology and the African Paediatric Nephrology Association. A renal registry for Africa: first steps. Clinical Kidney Journal 2016; 9: 162-167.

8) Pruthi R, Casula A, MacPhee IAM. UK Renal Registry 18th Annual Report: Chapter 3 Demographic and Biochemistry Profile of Kidney Transplant Recipients in the UK in 2014: National and Centre-specific Analyses. Nephron 2016;132 Suppl1: 69-97.




Books

Woodward S, Oliveira D. Eureka Renal Medicine, an undergraduate textbook. JP Medical Ltd; 30th September 2016. David Oliveira is also one of three series editors for this entire Eureka series.

Banerjee D, Goldsmith. Effect of vitamin D on endothelial function and blood pressure. Cardio Renal clinical challenges. D Golsmith J Spaak A Covic Editors. Springer International Publishing ISBN 978-3-319-09161-7





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